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Article
June 8, 1895

IRREGULAR OR ATYPICAL GOUT—HOW SHALL WE KNOW IT?

Author Affiliations

PHILADELPHIA, PA.

JAMA. 1895;XXIV(23):871-874. doi:10.1001/jama.1895.02430230005001a

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Abstract

It has always seemed to me that if the department of medicine as contrasted with surgery is to make advances, it must be by the application of accurate methods. This is equally true of nomenclature as of clinical investigation. In no subject in medicine has there been greater looseness in the application of terms than in that of gout, and in some recent studies of this interesting subject I have been so impressed with this fact that it occurred to me it might be worth while to attempt to formulate, briefly, criteria by which to judge of the presence of gout in its more irregular forms, with regard to which alone as contrasted with regular or typical gout the confusion really exists.

While many theories have been advanced and many experiments performed with a view to explaining the method of its accumulation, all pathologists agree that the fundamental condition of

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