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Article
October 14, 1905

RUPTURE OF INTESTINES BY KICK OF A HORSE.

Author Affiliations

BOULDER, COLO.

JAMA. 1905;XLV(16):1167. doi:10.1001/jama.1905.52510160041004a

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Abstract

History.  —A. W., a stout farm hand, was kicked in the abdomen by a heavy horse at 12 m. He was thrown some distance by the blow, falling on his shoulder, and lay unconscious for several minutes. He vomited once, but presented no signs of shock. The abdomen showed only a small bruise and was not very painful, for 1/16 grain of morphin relieved the pain. He rested easily and complained more of the pain in his shoulder than of that in his abdomen, until 7 p. m., thirty hours after the accident, when he began to vomit and to present evidences of shock which rapidly increased. He died at 11 a. m., forty-seven hours after being injured.

Autopsy.  —No external signs of injury. Internally, a general peritonitis from a transverse laceration of the small intestine about eighteen inches from the stomach. The laceration was one third of the circumference

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