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February 7, 1914

A FOREIGN IMPRESSION OF AMERICAN HOSPITAL SOCIAL SERVICE

JAMA. 1914;LXII(6):458-459. doi:10.1001/jama.1914.02560310036019
Abstract

There is a certain satisfaction to be derived from the praise, however qualified it may be, that comes to us from foreign shores. This is particularly true with respect to things medical, in the organization and conduct of which America has, as yet, done little more than serve an effective apprenticeship. Germany has so long been held before our eyes as a model of the best in everything pertaining to the activity of the physician and the therapeutic world in which he lives, that a word of commendation from German sources is gratifying. The development of the system of hospital social service, introduced at the Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston in 1905 and since then widely followed throughout the larger cities of the United States, has lately been pleasingly referred to in a magazine devoted to the interests of women in Germany. Mrs. Strauss,1 wife of the Berlin clinician

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