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Article
July 24, 1897

MULTIPLE NEURITIS FOLLOWING INFLUENZA.

Author Affiliations

INSTRUCTOR IN PHYSICAL DIAGNOSIS IN THE UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA; VISITING PHYSICIAN TO ST. JOSEPH'S HOSPITAL; MEDICAL REGISTRAR TO THE PHILADELPHIA HOSPITAL. PHILADELPHIA.

JAMA. 1897;XXIX(4):152-158. doi:10.1001/jama.1897.02440300004001a
Abstract

Multiple neuritis as a cause of pain, paralysis and wasting was for years overlooked. Graves suggested that many cases of paralysis attributed to disease of the brain or spinal cord might be due to disease of the peripheral nerves. James Jackson described alcoholic paralysis in 1822, and in 1864 Duménil first attributed it to multiple neuritis. It is from Duménil's time that the modern study of multiple neuritis dates. He was followed at a considerable interval of time by Joffroy (1879), Leyden (1880) and Grainger Stewart (1881). Since Stewart's paper the disease has been generally recognized and by degrees an extensive literature has accumulated. The danger now is, not that multiple neuritis will be overlooked but that affections really due to disease of the central and peripheral nervous systems shall be regarded as due exclusively to lesion of the nerves. Several writers have already recorded cases showing the existence of

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