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Article
November 18, 1905

THE VALUE OF SINGLE CLINICAL SYMPTOMS IN THE DIAGNOSIS OF TYPHOID FEVER.

JAMA. 1905;XLV(21):1575-1576. doi:10.1001/jama.1905.02510210045007
Abstract

In no common disease more than in typhoid fever does the diagnosis depend on the correlation of single symptoms, and no common disease is more often incorrectly diagnosed. If the Spanish War had shown nothing else of medical interest, the information it gave us regarding the difficulty of diagnosing this disease would have been of inestimable value. Those who looked over the admirable report of Reed, Shakespeare and Vaughan must have been struck with the fact that more mistakes in diagnosis were made in connection with typhoid than with any other common condition. In civil practice, too, a similar condition has prevailed and still prevails. Too many practitioners still fail to realize that a fever that does not yield with reasonable promptness to quinin is not malaria, and that in many districts the only continued fever is typhoid. It is but a few years since Osler, in an address before

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