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Article
August 14, 1897

CONVERGENT STRABISMUS.A CLINICAL LECTURE DELIVERED IN RUSH MEDICAL COLLEGE.

Author Affiliations

CHICAGO, ILL.

JAMA. 1897;XXIX(7):328-333. doi:10.1001/jama.1897.02440330028001i
Abstract

I. Its Etiology.  We have read that a child's education ought to be started before its birth; and, in our opinion, the consideration of strabismus is incomplete unless we remember that the ancestral history of these cases often contains an account of one or more persons where the visual line of one eye deviated from the object looked at with the other eye. Such predisposition undoubtedly tends to the production of squint in the offspring. The young of all animals remain with closed eyes for a variable period after birth. The human offspring is no exception. Whether this is due to a sudden change from darkness to light, or because the retinal functional development is inadequate for useful purposes, or because the brain itself is dormant, or because of all these several conditions combined, is unknown. The baby automaton has not yet awoke to the necessities of vision. Its functions

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