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Article
August 28, 1897

CLINICAL AND PATHOLOGIC FEATURES OF TWO CASES OF TYPHOID MENINGITIS.

Author Affiliations

DIRECTOR OF THE PATHOLOGIC LABORATORY OF THE OHIO HOSPITAL FOR EPILEPTICS, GALLIOPOLIS, OHIO; PROFESSOR OF PATHOLOGY IN THE CLEVELAND COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS.

JAMA. 1897;XXIX(9):419-423. doi:10.1001/jama.1897.02440350015001b
Abstract

It will scarcely be necessary to point out, to an audience composed of clinicians and pathologists of large experience, the comparative rarity with which typhoid meningitis is encountered. In fact, the presence of an actual meningitis was so rarely demonstrated in typhoid fever that much doubt existed, only a few years ago, as to the occurrence of this lesion purely typhoidal in its origin. Since 1890, however, several cases of typhoid meningitis have been studied by careful bacteriologic and pathologic methods, so that there can no longer be a reasonable doubt concerning the identity of this complication of typhoid fever.

In a comparatively small number of autopsies on typhoid fever cases, it has fallen to my lot to meet with three instances in which a cerebral meningitis could be demonstrated, and in two of these cases a thorough bacteriologic analysis revealed only the bacillus of typhoid fever as the infecting

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