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Article
December 9, 1905

THE FATIGUE OF COLD-BLOODED COMPARED WITH THAT OF WARM-BLOODED MUSCLE.

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK CITY.

JAMA. 1905;XLV(24):1776-1777. doi:10.1001/jama.1905.52510240006001b
Abstract

Our knowledge of the physiology of muscle has been obtained chiefly through the study of cold-blooded animals. Especial stress has thus far not been laid on the fact that the muscles of certain animals are subjected throughout life to a moderately high and fairly constant temperature, while with others the temperature is usually much lower and variable.

The question has hardly been raised as to whether such different physical conditions connote different physiologic characteristics. A priori we might expect such to be the case, and the observations here reported actually demonstrate a difference in one respect, namely, in some of the physical phenomena of fatigue.

It is commonly believed that the main physical characteristics of the fatiguing, as distinguished from the fresh muscle, are a slowing of the whole process of contraction, which is manifested by a lengthening of the descending portion of the muscle curve; and a diminution in

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