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April 25, 1914

INFLAMMATION OF THE GALL-BLADDERITS CAUSES, SYMPTOMS AND RESULTS

JAMA. 1914;LXII(17):1295-1297. doi:10.1001/jama.1914.02560420001001
Abstract

Inflammation of the gall-bladder, like many other inflammatory affections, varies so much in grade that certain mild forms do not cause appreciable symptoms, while it may be so severe as to justify the adjective "fulminating." In either event the mischief wrought corresponds with the degree of severity.

Its causes are those usual to inflammation, most frequently some pathogenic organism favored or not by local irritation of a mechanical kind. Perhaps the most common cause is the typhoid bacillus, which creeps up the common duct from the bowel. The favoring cause may be gall-stones preexisting in the bladder, or they alone may irritate enough to light up an inflammation. Again, there may be inflammation in adjacent parts which extends per contiguum to the gall-bladder. The variety associated with typhoid fever is most familiar to us and commonly ushers itself with a chill and fever, with pain and tenderness in the neighborhood

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