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Article
October 2, 1897

THE ANIMAL SUTURE; ITS PREPARATION AND TECHNIQUE OF APPLICATION.

JAMA. 1897;XXIX(14):669-672. doi:10.1001/jama.1897.02440400005002a

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Abstract

In modern wound technic the method of suturing assumes a very much greater importance than ever before. This is apparent from the fact that only until within a very recent period every suture was implanted with the predetermined purpose of its removal, a practice unfortunately too much in vogue at the present. In aseptic wounds the manifest object to be attained is, as far as possible, complete coaptation of the sundered parts, retention and rest in their normal relation. In order to secure correct mechanical coaptation in all deep wounds it is essential to use buried sutures. These when properly applied join the sundered surfaces so exactly that structures of like character are held in coaptation without the forming of pockets, therefore drainage in aseptic wounds is not alone unnecessary, but positively detrimental; unnecessary in that there are no superfluous fluids to be removed; detrimental, since it leaves open a

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