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Article
October 2, 1897

ACUTE PARTIAL ENTEROCELE.

JAMA. 1897;XXIX(14):683-691. doi:10.1001/jama.1897.02440400019002f
Abstract

Herniæ involving only a portion of the circumference of the bowel, and usually spoken of as Littre's herniæ, are of two forms: One is a diverticular hernia, a hernia where a diverticulum of the bowel forms the contents of the hernial sac; the other is the partial intestinal wall hernia, partial, lateral enterocele (enterocele partialis seu lateralis seu hemiperipherica), where only a segment of the free margin of the bowel forms the contents of the hernial sac. Partial intestinal wall herniæ occur in two forms: The acute partial enterocele, where the hernia is of sudden origin and without adhesions; the chronic partial enterocele, where the hernia is of slow origin and usually with adhesions; that the acute form occurs is denied. Clinical experience alone can refute this denial, and the material is not lacking that will constitute the necessary burden of proof to establish the fact that acute partial enterocele

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