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Article
October 9, 1897

SUCCESSFUL TREATMENT OF CHRONIC (SUBACUTE) RHEUMATISM.

Author Affiliations

MEMBER AMERICAN MEDICAL ASSOCIATION; MISSISSIPPI VALLEY MEDICAL ASSOCIATION; NORTHERN TRI-STATE MEDICAL ASSOCIATION, ETC. DETROIT, MICH.

JAMA. 1897;XXIX(15):723-724. doi:10.1001/jama.1897.02440410011002b

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Abstract

Chronic rheumatism, articular or muscular, is considered by the laity an incurable affection. The pain, stiffness, in other words, the disagreeable symptoms of rheumatism, however, drive them into the hands of physicians, usually after every kind neighbor's roots and liniments have failed.

It is this class of cases that the beginner in a community is most apt to get, the older physician's time being taken up with cases of a more or less acute character. Besides, the older physicians have prescribed once or twice for the rheumatic, but no cure being obtained he was dropped.

A few months ago the writer contracted chronic articular rheumatism and pleurodynia. It is therefore but natural that I should have paid some attention to this affection. Summing up my theoretical knowledge of the malady and my experience from actual practice, I think I can say without fear of contradiction that chronic rheumatism is a

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