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Article
December 5, 1896

CONGENITAL HYPERTROPHY OF THE PYLORUS AND STOMACH WALL.

JAMA. 1896;XXVII(23):1207-1209. doi:10.1001/jama.1896.02431010035005
Abstract

Instances of congenital hypertrophy of the muscular tissue of the pylorus and stomach are so rare, the etiology of the condition is so obscure, and the ultimate consequences so serious, that the following brief reference to the report of two cases by John Thomson1 may be of interest. Pitt2, Peden3 and Hirchsprung4 have reported cases more or less similar, but ordinarily the condition is not mentioned in the usual text-books.

The first one of the cases reported by Thomson concerns a male infant, eighteen days old, who for a week had been vomiting all his food. The only physical sign of disease that could be found was great emaciation. There was no distension of the bowels, and no abnormality on palpation of the abdomen. There was nothing in the family history to throw any light upon the condition. When the infant was born it was well developed and well nourished.

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