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Article
October 23, 1897

THE SIGNIFICANCE OF THE OCCURRENCE OF PATHOGENIC SPIRILLA IN THE WATERS OF THE DELAWARE AND SCHUYLKILL RIVERS AT PHILADELPHIA.

Author Affiliations

PHILADELPHIA, PA.

JAMA. 1897;XXIX(17):843-844. doi:10.1001/jama.1897.02440430023002i
Abstract

As a result of a systematic study of the waters of the lower Schuylkill and Delaware along the city front during the past year, I have found over a hundred spirilla, many of which possess pathogenic properties when inoculated into the lower animals, notably pigeons and guinea pigs.

A careful study of the morphologic and biologic characters of these organisms shows that many of them are very closely allied to the group of pathogenic spirilla with which we are already familiar, the most important member of that group being the spirillum choleræ Asiaticæ, or Koch's common bacillus. The resemblance in some instances is so close that one not expert in the exact differentiation of the members of this group of organisms would be unable to detect any differences. Others deviate slightly from this type, while a considerable number show more or less marked deviation from this type.

A considerable number

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