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Article
December 12, 1896

SYPHILIS SUCCESSFULLY TREATED BY HYDRIATICS.

Author Affiliations

VICE-PRESIDENT AMERICAN ACADEMY OF MEDICINE; CHAIRMAN SECTION ON STATE MEDICINE AMERICAN MEDICAL ASSOCIATION; CONSULTING PHYSICIAN CONVENT OF THE SACRED HEART. CHICAGO, ILL.

JAMA. 1896;XXVII(24):1224-1226. doi:10.1001/jama.1896.02431020006001d

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Abstract

There is, perhaps, no disease whose character is so black, and whose ravages are so universally distressing as that under consideration. The name syphilis strikes terror into the soul of its victim, and measureless encertainty in the mind of the professional attendant upon whose shoulders the responsibility of treatment is placed.

The exact origin of syphilis is uncertain. The records do not clearly establish by whom or at what time in the history of the world the disease was first discovered. There has been much discussion concerning this point, but little satisfaction has resulted. It is the common habit of Europeans to associate the disease with the return of the followers of Columbus, in 1493, from their discoveries of the West Indies. However this may be, without the shadow of a doubt, the same disease must have existed centuries before among the races of the Orient. The first record of

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