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Article
December 12, 1896

PRIMARY SARCOMA OF THE TAIL OF THE PANCREAS.

Author Affiliations

LATE HOUSE PHYSICIAN COOK COUNTY HOSPITAL, CHICAGO.

JAMA. 1896;XXVII(24):1240-1242. doi:10.1001/jama.1896.02431020022001k
Abstract

Sarcoma has been found in almost all parts of the human body where mesoblastic tissue occurs. The frequency of its place of origin, however, varies greatly so that sarcomata in some locations are common, in others almost unknown. Thus primary sarcomata of the bones, eye, kidney, glands, brain, etc., occur with relative frequency, but primary sarcoma of the pancreas, for instance, is very rare. This statement is substantiated by our best known writers, some of whom emphasize their rarity; others make no reference to primary pancreatic sarcomata at all. Thus Ziegler1 writes that such growths are extraordinarily rare and Orth2 says that primary sarcoma of the pancreas is almost unheard of.

To show the relative frequency of tumors of different varieties occuring in the pancreas, I may refer to Segrè's3 table of 11,492 autopsies with 132 pancreatic tumors, of which 127 were carcinomata, 2 were cysts, 2

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