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Article
November 13, 1897

Homeopathy vs. Rational Practice.

JAMA. 1897;XXIX(20):1025. doi:10.1001/jama.1897.02440460045009

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Abstract

La Porte, Ind., Oct. 22, 1897.

To the Editor:  —Yesterday I received from my publishers, the W. T. Keener Company, the Journal for September 25, on pp. 661-2 of which is notice of my little book "Principles of Medicine." Will you permit me to correct the erroneous impression which the closing words of that notice are likely to have made upon your readers? The writer quotes me as follows: "'It is perfectly well known that a very large majority of us homeopathists do not repudiate practices which we think useful, although they are not instances of homeopathy.'" The quotation is (substantially) correct, but his interpretation of it is misleading when he continues: "In other words, according to our author, whatever he is satisfied cures the patient is homeopathy." Look again at his quotation from me: We "do not repudiate practices which we think useful, although they are not instances of

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