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Article
February 10, 1906

GANGRENE OF THE GALL BLADDER. RUPTURE OF THE COMMON BILE DUCT, WITH A NEW SIGN.

Author Affiliations

CINCINNATI.

JAMA. 1906;XLVI(6):395-397. doi:10.1001/jama.1906.62510330001001
Abstract

In 1879 I had the privilege of reporting my first gallstone operation to the American Medical Association. In the intervening years, the surgery of the gall bladder and bile ducts has been so far developed that individual case reports have no place in our overburdened literature, unless, as by their aggregated number, they add weight to some general principle involved in the choice of and time for operation, or throw light on the causes of death in seemingly simple cases. The two case reports, I submit, do not belong to either category, but their comparative rarity must serve as my excuse for presenting them.

GANGRENE OF THE GALL BLADDER. 

Patient.  —A. B., male, aged 21, was admitted to the Jewish Hospital June 25, 1905.

History.  —The patient, whose father and mother are both living, has never, to his knowledge, been ill, except for a pneumonia four years before the onset

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