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Article
February 10, 1906

THE PHARMACOPEIA AND THE PHYSICIAN.CATHARTICS.

JAMA. 1906;XLVI(6):429-430. doi:10.1001/jama.1906.62510330035002
Abstract

CHAPTER VII. 

The Anhydrid Group.  The active principles in drugs of this group are resinous in character; their chemistry is obscure, but most of them are known to be glucosides. They cause violent irritation and even death in excessive doses and are not commonly used alone unless a strong irritant action is desired. Since they produce very watery stools, they are sometimes used in dropsy, or to sweep away parasites—for instance, after a narcotic tenifuge, such as aspidium.

Jalapa.  —U. S.—Jalap, the dried tuberous root of Exogonium purga, gathered in the neighborhood of Jalapa, Mexico, whence its name. The drug was introduced into Europe about 1609; it is now official in all pharmacopeias. The drug should contain not less than 8 per cent. of total resin, but not more than 1.5 per cent. of resin soluble in ether.Average dose (in powder): 1 gm. (15 grains).

Pulvis Jalapæ Compositus.  —U.

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