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Article
December 11, 1897

SOME CASES OF TUBERCULAR MENINGITIS.

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK, N. Y.

JAMA. 1897;XXIX(24):1204-1208. doi:10.1001/jama.1897.02440500018002e

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Abstract

Since the first description of tubercular meningitis by Whyt, in 1768, the disease has been studied and described by a legion of authors, and yet today the most experienced diagnostician finds difficulty in arriving at a correct, early diagnosis. The invariable fatality of the disease is recognized both by parents and physicians and increases the obligation of not regarding the early symptoms of no importance, or ascribing them to a gastric catarrh or nervousness. Fortunately, the life of the patient does not depend on an early recognition of the disease, for as yet no remedy has been discovered which if given either early or late in the disease can in any way affect its course. We can not depend on one symptom, but rather on a group, of at times irregular symptoms, to base a diagnosis. The younger the child the greater difficulty. A known exposure to tubercular infection or

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