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Article
December 11, 1897

THE CLINICAL IMPORTANCE OF THE EYE SYMPTOMS IN ARRIVING AT A DIAGNOSIS OF MENINGITIS IN CHILDREN.

Author Affiliations

Assistant Surgeon Manhattan Eye and Ear Hospital; Instructor in Diseases of the Eye, Post-graduate Medical School; Attending Ophthalmic Surgeon. Bellevue Hospital, O.D.P. NEW YORK, N. Y.

JAMA. 1897;XXIX(24):1208-1213. doi:10.1001/jama.1897.02440500022002f
Abstract

In bringing the subject of diagnosis of meningitis in children before this Section of this learned society for consideration, it is for the purpose of specifically directing your attention to the eye symptoms in this disease and of their importance in arriving at a correct diagnosis.

In 1888, Swanzy,1 in an instructive paper on the "Value of Eye Symptoms in the Localization of Brain Disease," was led to remark that "these eye symptoms are not as much valued as they should be, perhaps because their often subtle and sometimes subjective nature renders them less readily studied than are other focal brain symptoms." Also, that "eye symtoms are too often not looked for at first but utilized rather as a dernier ressort."

While no doubt the eyes and their symptoms in relation to all diseases have received much closer attention than formerly, it only too often happens that the general

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