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Article
July 6, 1895

CONSERVATIVE SURGERY ON THE BATTLEFIELD AND FIRST AID TO THE WOUNDED.

Author Affiliations

COLONEL AND SURGEON-GENERAL OF THE ILLINOIS NATIONAL GUARD; PRESIDENT OF ASSOCIATION OF MILITARY SURGEONS OF ILLINOIS; EX-PRESIDENT OF THE ASSOCIATON OF MILITARY SURGEONS OF THE UNITED STATES. CHICAGO.

JAMA. 1895;XXV(1):8-14. doi:10.1001/jama.1895.02430270008002

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Abstract

Conservatism will characterize the military surgery of the future. The two great sources of danger that face the wounded soldier upon the battle—hemorrhage and infection—will be greatly diminished by additional and improved hemostatic measures, and the more general and effective application of the principles of aseptic and antiseptic surgery. Mutilating primary operations will be limited to injuries with extensive destruction of the soft parts and complications involving large vessels and nerves which in themselves are sufficient to arrest the nutrition of the injured limb. Gunshot injuries of bones and joints will no longer determine the propriety of primary resection and amputation, and the danger of penetrating wounds of any of the large cavities of the body will be greatly diminished by the prompt employment of measures calculated to prevent septic infection, and other immediate and remote complications. I take it for granted, that I am expected on this occasion

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