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Article
February 20, 1904

THE DEVELOPMENT OF HARD TISSUE IN THE PULP OF HUMAN TEETH.

Author Affiliations

BRIGHTON, ENGLAND.

JAMA. 1904;XLII(8):521-528. doi:10.1001/jama.1904.92490530001001d
Abstract

Of the functions performed by the various organs of the body there are few, if any, more interesting or have the power of producing more varied results than that of the tooth pulp. In health it is the benefactor of the surrounding hard tissue; in disease, the medium whereby we are warned of the mischief that is going on. Among the varied functions of this organ may be placed the power of developing "secondary dentin."

Nature in many cases endeavors to overcome the evil produced by the destroying microbe, by forming a layer of fresh tissue between the soft, sensitive pulp and the dentin that is being broken down by decay; the same protective measure also occurs in those cases where erosion has commenced its destructive work, as well as in many other instances where disintegration of the hard tissue has been produced, by the various known causes. In all

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