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Article
March 17, 1906

THE GENERAL CONDITIONS ASSOCIATED WITH INSANITY.THEIR CONNOTATIONS AND CERTAIN DEDUCTIONS AS TO THEIR SIGNIFICANCE.

Author Affiliations

Superintendent of St. Peter State Hospital. ST. PETER, MINN.

JAMA. 1906;XLVI(11):765-773. doi:10.1001/jama.1906.62510380003001a
Abstract

The thesis to be defended in this paper is formulated in the following statement: There can not be special change in an organ without general disease in the rest of the organism, and in the study and treatment of the special condition the general involvement and its extent are the most important.

There are two assumptions in this connection which may be made concerning the human organism, based on what is known of its cytology and what has been demonstrated as to the processes of its functional activity. First, that the primary functions are those of vegetation, and that all others are related and in sequence to some form of activity involved in the processes of nutrition; second, that the nervous system is the last in the order of development and the most complex in its structure; also, the complexity of the structure and functions of the nervous system has

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