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Article
April 7, 1906

BILHARZIA DISEASE.REPORT OF TWO CASES OBSERVED AMONG PORTO RICANS IN SAN FRANCISCO.

Author Affiliations

Instructor of Clinical Medicine, Cooper Medical College; Associate Professor of Tropical Medicine, Postgraduate Department University of California (San Francisco Polyclinic.); SAN FRANCISCO.

JAMA. 1906;XLVI(14):1031-1032. doi:10.1001/jama.1906.62510410033009
Abstract

Bilharzia disease, called also endemic hematuria and bilharziosis, is caused by a trematode worm or fluke inhabiting principally the portal venous system, where it deposits its eggs, the escape of which into certain organs produces the various symptoms of the disease.

Bilharz discovered the parasite in 1851, and later the disease was named after him.

The disease is quite prevalent in some parts of the world, but until recently few cases had been observed outside of endemic areas. In many parts of Africa it is quite common.

In Egypt over 50 per cent. of the population harbors the parasite. Cases have been observed in Cyprus, Sicily and Mauritius.

British soldiers returning from South Africa have probably disseminated the disease to a considerable extent, as recently shown by Douglass1 and Hardy.

In the United States, so far as I am able to find, only six cases have been

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