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September 7, 1895

CLINICAL MICROSCOPY.

Author Affiliations

LECTURER ON PATHOLOGY AND DIRECTOR OF THE MICROSCOPIC AND BACTERIOLOGIC LABORATORY OF THE KEOKUK (IOWA) MEDICAL COLLEGE.

JAMA. 1895;XXV(10):412-415. doi:10.1001/jama.1895.02430360026001i

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Abstract

In presenting a paper on the subject of scientific medicine and the microscope, I have no discoveries to reveal, nor shall I attempt to review the progress in the science of medicine brought about through the revelations of the microscope; but rather will I direct your attention to its clinical value. With this in view, we will omit detailed reference to the important facts revealed by studying the minute anatomy of the different organs in both their normal and diseased conditions. It is axiomatic that the more we know of the structure, both macroscopic and microscopic, of organs healthy or diseased, the more capable are we to understand the physiologic and pathologic processes which occur in those organs or tissues; and so we will not dwell on those points. Moreover a large part of such knowledge has been acquired through study of the post-mortem specimen.

But to-day I desire to

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