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Article
May 5, 1906

THE EXTENT AND LIMITATIONS OF THE POWER TO REGENERATE IN MAN AND OTHER VERTEBRATES.

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK CITY.

JAMA. 1906;XLVI(18):1327-1330. doi:10.1001/jama.1906.62510450001001
Abstract

About the middle of the eighteenth century great interest was aroused in the power shown by certain animals to replace lost parts. The remarkable work of Trembley, Bonnet and Spallanzani made known some of the principal results with which we are familiar to-day. Many new facts have also been discovered since their time, but despite the fundamental importance of the phenomena of regeneration, little is known at present in regard to the physiology of the process. Nevertheless, a beginning in the study of the physiology of regeneration has been made, and I invite your attention especially to some of the more general aspects of this side of the problem.

In this connection I should like to discuss also the question why certain animals seem to lack the power to replace lost parts; and since man himself belongs to this class, the meaning of the fact is of direct and, perhaps,

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