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Article
October 19, 1895

INCIPIENT CATARACT.

Author Affiliations

PROFESSOR OF OPHTHALMOLOGY, OTOLOGY AND LARYNGOLOGY IN THE MEDICAL DEPARTMENT OF THE UNIVERSITY OF WOOSTER. CLEVELAND, OHIO.

JAMA. 1895;XXV(16):649-650. doi:10.1001/jama.1895.02430420005002a
Abstract

It is surprising how little real progress has been made in our knowledge of the etiology and pathology of cataract since the investigations of Marriotte,1 Boerhaave2 and Brisseau,3 two hundred years ago.

In a paper read before this Section in 1892, I presented some thoughts on infantile cataract.4 What I have to say to-day will apply more particularly to the so-called senile and other forms of cataract in adults.

In a large manufacturing city, like Cleveland, nearly one-half of the opacities of the lens coming under the observation of the ophthalmic surgeon are the result of traumatism, but as a discussion of injuries of the eye would require more than ten minutes, I pass to the consideration of other forms of cataract.

That there is a diabetic cataract is now generally recognized. That under dietetic and medicinal treatment the opacity of the lenses may disappear is

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