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Article
May 12, 1906

A CASE OF HEMORRHAGE FROM THE STOMACH, DUE TO CIRRHOSIS OF THE LIVER, IN WHICH GASTROENTEROSTOMY WAS DONE ON THE SUPPOSITION THAT THERE WAS GASTRIC OR DUODENAL ULCER.

Author Affiliations

Attending Surgeon to the Orthopedic Hospital and Infirmary for Nervous Diseases, and to St. Agnes' Hospital; Consulting Surgeon to the West Philadelphia Hospital for Women. PHILADELPHIA.

JAMA. 1906;XLVI(19):1420-1424. doi:10.1001/jama.1906.62510460014001c
Abstract

NARRATIVE OF CASE. 

Patient.  —A man of 40 years of age, of rather medium height and weight, family history negative.

Previous History.  —There was no tendency to tuberculous or other constitutional disease, and he had never had syphilis. He had always enjoyed good health, was a steady, hard worker in an office where he had large business responsibilities, and he took unusually good care of his health. He lived in the country, where he walked, and rode a bicycle. He ate plain food and never touched liquor or tobacco. About thirteen years previously he had had a severe attack of typhoid fever with very high temperature, but from this he made a complete recovery. His wife said that he had never been ill, and had never taken any medicine beyond an occasional dose of calomel for his liver, which at times had been torpid. He was a dark brunette with

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