[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
May 12, 1906

LEUCOCYTES AND OPSONINS IN THE DEFENSE OF THE BODY.

JAMA. 1906;XLVI(19):1444. doi:10.1001/jama.1906.02510460038005

This article is only available in the PDF format. Download the PDF to view the article, as well as its associated figures and tables.

Abstract

In certain infections the chief means of defense of the body seems to lie in the production of antitoxic substances that neutralize the poisons of the invading organisms. In a second class of infections no distinct soluble toxins are produced, hence no antitoxins are formed, and the resistance of the host seems to depend on the development of bactericidal substances that destroy the bacteria. There remains, however, a large and important group of infections, including especially tuberculosis and infections with the pus cocci, in which neither antitoxic nor bactericidal substances seem to be produced to defend the invaded host, and with these the chief source of resistance seems to lie in the action of the leucocytes. Until recently the exact significance of the leucocytes in the defense of the body against these infectious agents was a matter of uncertainty, and the source of much dispute. As one of the first

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×