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Article
April 2, 1904

THE INFLUENCE OF DENTAL DISEASE ON THE ETIOLOGY OF CERTAIN OCULAR DISTURBANCES.

JAMA. 1904;XLII(14):889-891. doi:10.1001/jama.1904.92490590023001h
Abstract

That dental caries and its allied processes figure to a considerable degree in the etiology of certain ocular disorders seems to have been generally recognized by those who have made this subject a matter of careful observation. Difficult early dentition, also, has long been considered in the same light, and as far back as 1824, Travers1 called attention to strabismus as a symptom sometimes arising from this cause. Galezowski,2 the eminent French ophthalmologist, has, for several decades, enthusiastically supported the theory of dental causation of various eye troubles, and many of the ablest contributions to the literature of this subject are from his pen. So strongly imbued with the teachings of his confrére was Weinberg,3 that he expressed the belief that during a nine months' dispensary service he saw 188 cases of ocular disturbance dependent on morbid dental changes. Henry Power,1 in 1883, read a meritorious paper on the subject

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