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Article
November 23, 1895

THE IMPORTANCE OF AURAL ANATOMY IN ROUTINE CLINICAL WORK.

Author Affiliations

PHILADELPHIA.

JAMA. 1895;XXV(21):885-887. doi:10.1001/jama.1895.02430470005002a

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Abstract

That the aural surgeon must have the topography of the ear and the surroundings clear in his mind and ready at his finger ends, when operating on the mastoid or still more within the tympanum, is evident to all. He must be thus posted, or wholly belie his status as a specialist. Yet it is no less true that the practitioner who would well treat, topically, the routine cases, still more attempt paracentesis as most of the text-books advise, must know the variations in the configuration of the external auditory canal, the size, depth and inclination of the drum-head and the structures which lie beyond it within easy reach of damage by his manipulations. Unfortunately, much experience in post-graduate teaching shows that the majority of men of some otologic experience reveal serious defects in this direction; and do some very bungling work, however posted in the theory; not so much

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