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Article
November 30, 1895

SCROFULOSIS, CHLOROSIS AND TUBERCULOSIS AND THEIR TREATMENT.

Author Affiliations

PROFESSOR OF PHYSICAL DIAGNOSIS CHICAGO POLICLINIC; CONSULTING PHYSICIAN DEACONESS HOSPITAL, " LIGHT AND HOPE."

JAMA. 1895;XXV(22):944-949. doi:10.1001/jama.1895.02430480022001e

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Abstract

I.—TUBERCULOSIS AND ITS DIRECT CAUSE.  During the present century, medical writers have been very active on the subject of tuberculosis, and we can readily understand this activity when we remember that nearly one-seventh of the human race die of this disease. The disease commonly recognized as consumption has been known since the Dark Ages. Even Hippocrates has given a good description of it, at least in reference to lung and pleura, finding the characteristics of this morbid process in a suppurative destruction of the affected organ. Later on, the above-mentioned suppurative destruction was found in other organs also, but as the changes found in the lungs were predominant, not only in the clinical picture, but also in the anatomic findings, those changes in the other organs were believed to be of a secondary nature, the tuberculosis of the lungs being primary. It was observed that the formation of certain nodular

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