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Article
June 9, 1906

THE MEDICAL PROFESSION AND THE ISSUES WHICH CONFRONT IT.PRESIDENT'S ADDRESS AT THE FIFTY-SEVENTH ANNUAL SESSION OF THE AMERICAN MEDICAL ASSOCIATION AT BOSTON, JUNE 5-8, 1906.

Author Affiliations

ROCHESTER, MINN.

JAMA. 1906;XLVI(23):1737-1740. doi:10.1001/jama.1906.62510500001001

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Abstract

The American Medical Association begins its fifty-seventh Annual Session under the most auspicious circumstances. After an interval of forty-one years it again meets in Boston, the guest of this great commonwealth which has ably upheld the highest medical traditions since the founding of New England.

Another cause of felicitation: The sectional differences in New York have been overcome and the Empire State, for the first time in twenty-five years, presents a unified delegation.

The House of Delegates of the American Medical Association (which technically is the American Medical Association) represents directly about 55,000 and indirectly the 120,000 regular practitioners of medicine in the United States. The official organ, The Journal, reaches each week over 43,000 subscribers, and, under the able editorship of Dr. George H. Simmons, has become the leading professional magazine in the world.

The medical profession is to be congratulated on these evidences of a useful organization, but

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