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January 4, 1896

CEREBRAL LOCALIZATION IN THE LIGHT OF RECENT HISTOLOGIC RESEARCHES.

JAMA. 1896;XXVI(1):23-24. doi:10.1001/jama.1896.02430530023001h

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Abstract

A year or two ago, we were inclined to think that the subject of cerebral localization had been practically settled, and that we were not likely to get much new light upon mooted questions.

Recent histologic investigations—brought together in a valuable paper in Brain, by Andriezen, which paper also contains much original work—have divided and subdivided the cortex into new layers and sublayers, and have determined and traced the constituents of these layers in a manner which a few years ago would have seemed utterly impossible. The resulting generally accepted histologic subdivision of the cortex is into four layers—the molecular ambiguous, great pyramidal and polymorphic. The molecular layer, which is the most superficial cortical strip, has been subdivided into strata, and more than a dozen cell and fiber systems have been traced to it and within it. Practically, the standpoint which I have always taken with reference to the question of

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