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Article
January 11, 1896

SOME REMARKS ON TEST MEALS.

Author Affiliations

CLINICAL PROFESSOR OF DISEASES OF THE STOMACH, BALTIMORE MEDICAL COLLEGE. BALTIMORE, MD.

JAMA. 1896;XXVI(2):68-69. doi:10.1001/jama.1896.02430540020002f

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Abstract

Test meals are given for the purpose of testing the digestive and motor power of the stomach, and thus judging of the condition of the mucous membrane and its glandular elements, as well as of its muscular action and its size, for an enlarged, or rather dilated, stomach depends chiefly upon these conditions.

The test meal now almost universally employed is Ewald's test breakfast, consisting of 30 to 50 grams of bread and 300 c.c. of warm water, or tea without sugar or milk.

One hour after this meal a soft, elastic tube is introduced into the stomach, and the entire contents of the stomach brought up, either by attaching an aspirator apparatus to the tube, or by pressing with the hand at the epigastrium, and encouraging the patient to assist this pressure by contraction of the abdominal muscles as it is done for defecation.

Other test meals have been

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