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Article
February 1, 1896

A SUGGESTION THAT NATIONAL LEGISLATION PROVIDE FOR A MEDICAL EXAMINING BOARD TO CONFER A SPECIAL DEGREE IN MEDICINE AND SURGERY: AND THAT THEREAFTER THE STATES, THROUGH THEIR MEDICAL LICENSING BOARDS, SHALL LICENSE ONLY UPON THIS DEGREE.

Author Affiliations

DEMONSTRATOR OF ANATOMY AND ADJUNCT TO THE CHAIR OF ANATOMY, COOPER MEDICAL COLLEGE, SAN FRANCISCO, CAL.

JAMA. 1896;XXVI(5):209-211. doi:10.1001/jama.1896.02430570011001c
Abstract

That there is a plethora of medical colleges and of medical students and practitioners in the United States, is so well-known that it is unnecessary to make the assertion in this paper. That this condition does not exist in countries in which governmental restriction is exercised over the examining and licensing of physicians and surgeons is clearly shown by statistics giving the relative number of medical colleges, students and practitioners in proportion to population in the several countries of the world.

From an editorial published in the Journal of the American Medical Association, dated March 24, 1894, it is said of the number of students attending the 136 medical colleges in the United States (109 regular medical colleges, 19 "homeopathic" and 8 "eclectic"): "At the sessions of 1885 the total attendance was 10,891 of which 9,245 were regular, 1,032 homeopathic, 614 eclectic. During the sessions of 1893, the attendance was

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