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Article
February 8, 1896

HYSTERIC BLINDNESS AND PSEUDO-MENINGITIS, WITH REPORT OF A CASE TREATED BY HYPNOTISM.

Author Affiliations

PROFESSOR OF NEUROLOGY IN THE CHICAGO POLICLINIC; INSTRUCTOR IN CLINICAL NEUROLOGY, NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY MEDICAL SCHOOL; CONSULTING NEUROLOGIST TO THE ILLINOIS EASTERN HOSPITAL FOR THE INSANE; ETC. CHICAGO.

JAMA. 1896;XXVI(6):262-265. doi:10.1001/jama.1896.02430580014001e
Abstract

Hysteric amblyopia with contracted visual field and dyschromatopsia is common, monocular amaurosis is less common and hysteric total blindness is rare. Gilles de la Tourette in his recent work1 refers to only eight cases as already published, viz., Landouzy, two cases;2 Briquet, three cases;3 Marlowe,4 Würdeman5 and Levy,6 each one case; and in looking up the references I find that the case of Würdeman is not a case in point, but one of hysteric deafness. To these I have been able to add fourteen more from the literature beside my own. Harlan7 refers to a case cured by the application of an imaginary magnet and to another which occurred in the practice of Dr. Agnew. Jeaffreson,8 two cases; Moore9 mentions a case occurring in the practice of a colleague. Brown,10 one case, although it is not reported as one of

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