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Article
March 7, 1896

INTERSTITIAL KERATITIS.

Author Affiliations

LATE RESIDENT CLINICAL ASSISTANT, NEW YORK OPHTHALMIC AND AURAL INSTITUTE. LINCOLN, NEB.

JAMA. 1896;XXVI(10):455-457. doi:10.1001/jama.1896.02430620007002a
Abstract

On account of the transparency of the corneal tissues, enabling us to observe accurately and follow up faithfully any changes which take place in its structure, inflammations of the cornea have for the pathologist more than the usual amount of interest. This is especially so in regard to interstitial keratitis, where the changes are so slow as to be easily followed in part, while some of the phenomena are so completely concealed as to make us even more curious in regard to them. The anatomic seat of the affection is not peculiar to it; the clinical course is, however, and interstitial keratitis presents a well-defined and characteristic picture. In the majority of cases it attacks both eyes, though seldom both at the same time, and usually several weeks, or months, or even years, intervene between the attacks. Owing to this feature the opportunity often presents itself of observing the beginning

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