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March 7, 1896

THE SPECIFIC NATURE OF THE ANTITOXIC SUBSTANCES IN THE BLOOD OF ANIMALS RENDERED IMMUNE AGAINST THE BACILLUS TYPHOSUS AND THE BACILLUS COLI COMMUNIS.

JAMA. 1896;XXVI(10):486-487. doi:10.1001/jama.1896.02430620038006

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Abstract

The question of the identity of the bacillus of typhoid fever and the bacillus coli communis has been discussed and studied by bacteriologists for quite a long time without reaching conclusions that have seemed perfectly satisfactory to all interested. These two microörganisms are so similar morphologically and culturally that one is often spoken of as a variation from the other, both being either identical or very closely related. It is true that the colon bacillus produces gas in glucose media, causes an acid reaction with caseation in blue litmus milk, and that its bouillon cultures give the indol reaction; whereas the typhoid bacillus does not give these reactions, but every now and then one meets with bacilli that, from the manner in which they respond to these differential tests, seem to form connecting links between the colon bacillus, which is a normal inhabitant of the intestinal canal, and the typhoid

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