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Article
March 21, 1896

TREATMENT OF TYPHOID FEVER, WITH REPORT OF TWO CASES, BY WOODBRIDGE METHOD.

JAMA. 1896;XXVI(12):573-578. doi:10.1001/jama.1896.02430640025001i

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Abstract

With the exception of pulmonary tuberculosis, there is perhaps no disease about which more has been said and written than typhoid fever. Especially is this true of the last few decades. The literature of the medical world of to-day is filled to overflowing with treatises on the subject, a circumstance at which we do not wonder after a moment's reflection of its frequency, its almost universal distribution and the dangers to which its unfortunate victims are subjected. There is no disease known to us which has contributed with more regularity to the mortality of the world. During the last fifteen years in the cities of Paris, Berlin, New York, Philadelphia, Boston, Chicago and Baltimore it has annually killed upward of five persons out of every 10,000 of their population, and in Liverpool in 1865 it was responsible for 50 deaths to every 10,000 inhabitants. In our own city during the

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