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Article
March 28, 1896

THE USE OF COCAIN IN MINOR AMPUTATIONS.

Author Affiliations

CHIEF SURGEON, W. N. Y. & P. RY., BUFFALO, N. Y.

JAMA. 1896;XXVI(13):618-620. doi:10.1001/jama.1896.02430650020002d

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Abstract

Appreciating that at this, the second meeting of the Academy of Railway Surgeons, many papers of highly scientific and scholarly character would be read, I have ventured to tender one that may be as a rest "between the acts," but of a strictly practical character, and based entirely upon personal experience. I offer this brief paper as a fragmentary contribution to the literature upon cocain as a local anesthetic.

The question and study of anesthetics is always germane to the subject of surgery, and as railway surgeons we are close observers of the action of chloroform, ether and the other essentials used by way of inhalation for the purpose of producing neurotic narcosis for the relief of pain in our operative work.

Safety is, or always should be, our first consideration. The loss of sensibility, known as anesthesia, may be general or local, being dependent upon the agent and method

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