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Article
May 28, 1904

THE SIGNIFICANCE OF THE GLYCOGEN REACTION IN THE BLOOD.

JAMA. 1904;XLII(22):1421. doi:10.1001/jama.1904.02490670025004
Abstract

Originally described by Gabritschewski in 1891, this reaction seems to have been overlooked until 1902, when several observers, notably Locke and Cabot1 in this country, again called attention to its value. In 1903 Locke published a further communication,2 in which he quite sharply defined the advantages and limitations of the test. Quite recently Lovell Gulland3 has published the results of a long series of observations which completely substantiate the conclusions of Locke.

The test is such a simple one that it seems peculiar that it has not come into more general use. In order to make the test, a blood smear is placed face downward on a drop of a thick gummy solution of iodin and iodid of potash in gum arabic, and, after being allowed to remain for a minute to allow the action of the iodin to take effect, the excess of the solution is

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