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Article
April 11, 1896

A FEW NOTES ON EPILEPSY.

Author Affiliations

ASSISTANT PHYSICIAN TO CRAIG COLONY FOR EPILEPTICS. SONYEA, N. Y.

JAMA. 1896;XXVI(15):726-727. doi:10.1001/jama.1896.02430670028002i

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Abstract

The peculiar ideas that epileptics entertain about their attacks are well illustrated by some of their remarks in describing their seizures. Two or three characterized their fits as "dreamy spells." These were minor attacks in which consciousness was not completely lost, but there was confusion of ideas and a paralysis of will over many of the voluntary movements of the body. These have been designated as psychic attacks by some writers, but by others they are still classed with petit mal. The latter class of diagnosticians regard the subdivision, psychic, as an unnecessary refinement in classification and one not fully justifiable clinically.

One patient has designated his aura in a dramatic manner by saying: "First red, white and blue, followed by a sensation of falling down, down for a long distance; then darkness." During the attenuation of consciousness, the brain has time to record many sensory phenomena. As the elements

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