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Article
April 25, 1896

METHOD OF OBTAINING THE BEST POSSIBLE ASEPTIC CONDITION DURING OPERATIONS DONE AT PLACES OTHER THAN HOSPITALS.

Author Affiliations

SURGEON B. & O. RY., LITTLETON, W. VA.

JAMA. 1896;XXVI(17):816-818. doi:10.1001/jama.1896.02430690018002c

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Abstract

Pregnant with glory as are the annals of surgery from its earliest history to the middle of the nineteenth century, illuminated as it has been through the darkness of its endless struggles by the wisdom of such men as Hippocrates, Harvey, Jenner and the two Hunters in the old world, and Physic, Mott, Morton and Gross of the new, it was left to the closing years of this century to furnish such a revolution in surgery as was never dreamed of by its most brilliant and ambitious votaries, as it was thought and taught by the most eminent authorities that ulcerating stumps, sloughing flaps, and discharging sinuses, excessive rises in temperature, gangrene, etc., were due entirely to vicious conditions of the system, humors, imperfect ventilation and poisons that were inhaled; when cleanliness was urged it was as much for cosmetic reasons as any other. When Sir Joseph Lister startled the

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