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May 2, 1896

LONGEVITY OF PHYSICIANS.

JAMA. 1896;XXVI(18):852-857. doi:10.1001/jama.1896.02430700004002

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Abstract

All men think all men mortal, but themselves.—Young.

"It is a swift current—that stream of life, on which we ride. We fall asleep, and awaking, find ourselves almost home. Our companions, too, are constantly changing; at every moment new ones come aboard, and old ones leave us, and we have scarcely time to become familiar with their faces, or to make ourselves acquainted with their character or purposes, before they are summoned to the gangway—the boat is lowered, and we wave them a friendly farewell. All along the sands of that silent shore, which we now so faintly see, our friends have left us; and we are awaiting the time when, cheerfully, manfully and hopefully, I trust, we shall receive our summons and depart 'alike to the inevitable grave.'" —Extract from Dr. Frank H. Hamilton's Eulogium upon the life and character of T. Romeyn Beck, M.D., LL.D., February, 1856.

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