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Article
May 9, 1896

ON SOME OF THE LIMITS OF THE ART OF SURGERY.

Author Affiliations

PROFESSOR OF PRACTICE OF SURGERY AND CLINICAL SURGERY IN RUSH MEDICAL COLLEGE; ATTENDING SURGEON PRESBYTERIAN HOSPITAL; SURGEON-IN-CHIEF ST. JOSEPH'S HOSPITAL.

JAMA. 1896;XXVI(19):905-915. doi:10.1001/jama.1896.02430710007001a

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Abstract

Mr. President and Members of the American Medical Association:  —Modern surgery has attained a degree of development which entitles it to the distinction of a science and an art. As a science surgery is of recent date, having been founded and perfected during the last half of the present century. As an art it has been practiced for centuries by our ancestors with credit to themselves and benefit to the injured, the crippled and the sick. When Boyer wrote the introduction to his classic work on surgery he expressed the conviction that surgery had reached perfection. How little did he dream of the great changes that would be wrought in the practice of his cherished profession by the progressive pathologists and surgeons of the next few generations! How innocent and absurd does such a statement appear in the face of the labors of such men as Virchow, Rokitansky, Rindfleisch, Klebs,

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