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Article
June 11, 1904

LODGE PRACTICE AND THE WELL-TO-DO.

JAMA. 1904;XLII(24):1566-1567. doi:10.1001/jama.1904.02490690034013

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Abstract

An interesting little social fact is remarked on editorially by the Australasian Medical Gazette, April 20. Australia is a lodge-ridden country to all appearances, and the medical profession is more or less sweated, to use the usual term; in fact, probably more so than most other countries, though the fees may not be so ridiculously small as those against which our German confrères have successfully rebelled. The Gazette remarks that it may be interesting to its readers as well as to the general public to know that the complaints that have been made from time to time in regard to sweating the profession by the well-to-do are not without foundation. It says it has been informed, on good authority, that one of the members of the federal ministry of Australia, whose wife is a wealthy woman, takes advantage of his membership in a friendly lodge to procure medical treatment for

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