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Article
June 25, 1904

THE WILLIAM PEPPER LABORATORY OF CLINICAL MEDICINE.

JAMA. 1904;XLII(26):1678. doi:10.1001/jama.1904.92490710010002f

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Abstract

The three great institutions that have been spoken of—the Carnegie Institution, the Rockefeller Institute and the Memorial Institute of Chicago—differ materially from that of the small affair for which I am called on to speak. To borrow a quotation, if one were to compare cubs with lions, the smaller institutions, the clinical laboratories, have a very important work to perform, and one which will in the end compare favorably with the work of the greater institutions in this particular, namely, that their work is so very much more far reaching. The clinical laboratory is intended to subserve a double purpose, not only to furnish facilities and a place for investigations, but to elevate the tone of the staffs of hospitals with which these laboratories are connected.

The founder of this laboratory, who named it in honor of his distinguished father, professor of the practice of medicine in the University of

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