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Article
June 6, 1896

THE BEST METHODS OF TEACHING.THE BEST METHOD TO TEACH SURGERY.

Author Affiliations

BROOKLYN, N.Y.

JAMA. 1896;XXVI(23):1119-1121. doi:10.1001/jama.1896.02430750021001i

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Abstract

In teaching surgery the following points are important: The teacher must have large clinical observation as well as operative experience; he must be rapid in thought and have a good clear judgment. His knowledge must be well digested and at hand, so that he can call upon the storehouse of his practical knowledge for whatever he needs at any and all times and in every emergency. Though he may be influenced by the suggestions of his contemporaries he must rely, in the end, solely upon himself, since he alone is responsible.

In many ways a teacher is born, not made; that is, he has the teaching diathesis. He sees clearly the important facts of a case, knows how to present them to the medical student, distinctly, succinctly, impressively, for it must ever happen that the teacher who does not know a fact can not teach it to someone else.

It

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